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ABOUT BALI

 
Bali is a province, one of 33 provinces in Indonesia. The province of Bali is led by an elected Governor. For governmental administration purposes the island is divided into 8 regencies (Badung, Bangli, Buleleng, Gianyar, Jembrana, Klungkung, Karangasem and Tabanan), and 1 Capital called kota madya of Denpasar. Each regencies is headed by a Regent, while the Capital is led by Mayor. Every regencies and Capitaly consists of several districts, which are headed by Camats. A district has several villages administrative, with an elected Perbekel in every village to manage the governmental administration. Beside the Perbekel , there are several traditional chiefs village, The Bendesa adat who are responsible for the traditional and religious affairs in every desa adat, usually a desa adat has a smaller area than the desa administrative which means there are several desa adats in a Desa Administrative.

The smallest society is a Banjar, the association of a number of families with its various sub associations (women association, youth club, squirrel hunters group, dance group etc. A Banjar is led by its two elected chief, the klian Dinas who assist the Perbekel and the traditional chief kelian Adat who assist the Bendesa Adat, The condition and the progress of Banjar’s members could be easily indicated by the condition of its Public Hall ( Balai Banjar) and its alarm drums tower( Bale Kulkul).

Almost 85% of Balinese are Hindus with Christians, Buddhists and Moslems making up the remaining 15%.Bali Hinduism is at least 3,000 years old and is an interpretation of religious ideas from china, India and java. The Balinese have strong animist beliefs and spirits dominate their daily life which is included daily offerings of fruits and flowers to appease angry deities. Every village has three main temples dedicated to three manifestations of the almighty God those are; The God of creator (Brahma), The God of protector (Wisnu) and The God of destroyer (Ciwa). Numerous colorful temple ceremonies take place throughout the year.

Balinese have their own language ‘Bahasa Bali’. Bahasa Indonesia is their National Language; English is mostly understood in tourist areas

The daily temperature ranges between 20oC to 34oC, depending on the time of year, Similar to the rest of Indonesia, there are two seasons in Bali. The rainy season start from October to March and the dry season start from April to September. The lowest humidity is around 60% from July to September.

The valid currency circulated throughout Indonesia is Rupiah, divided into bills of Rp.100.000, Rp.50.000, Rp.20.000, Rp.10.000, Rp.5000, Rp.2000, Rp.1000, Rp.500, Rp.100 And coins of Rp.1000, Rp.500, Rp.200, Rp.100, Rp.50.

The best rate of exchange is from the bank. Although money changers are very competitive, Money can also be changed at your hotel reception desk but the rates are often lower than money changers. Normal banking hours are 09.00 am to 02.30 pm Monday to Friday and 09.00 am to midday on Saturday. Money changers are usually open until 10.00 pm.

The major credit cards (American Express, visa, master card) are generally accepted by hotels, large restaurants and shops. Restaurants and shop may ask you to pay a 3%surcharge if you want to pay by credit card.

Leave your valuable belongings, tickets, passport, Money in Safety deposit boxes which are available in your room or at the front desk.

Metered taxis can be found in or just outside your hotels, you should always ensure the meter will be used before getting into the taxi. The local public buses are called Bemo and you simply wave a bemo down on the street. Shout ‘stop’ when you want to get off! Please remember that bemo vehicles and taxis in bali do not have passengers liability insurance.

Most hotels and restaurants add 21%tax and service charges; additional tipping is not always expected but is always appreciated.